The Lost Symbol: Book Review

My third book of the year was Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol. The main character, Robert Langdon, is the same as in The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons. This time, the fast paced thriller takes place in Washington, DC, and involves the history of the Masons.

I know a lot of people look down on Dan Brown as an author but, in my opinion, his books are fun, exciting, and even educational (at least for me, who knows very little about symbolism and such).

This book was just as good as the others in the series. It was fast paced, the content was really interesting, and the mysteries remained that way until the end. All this made it very difficult to put down and, though I started it a month ago, I read the last 80% in the last 3 days.

The one complaint I have is some of the conversations between the characters are a bit unbelievable. When someone is in a time crunch to pass information on, they wouldn’t speak in code or wait until their companion figures it out themselves. This made it a bit clunky in parts. Because of this, I give the book a 4 out of 5.

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Comments on: "The Lost Symbol: Book Review" (6)

  1. I'm a book junkie but I only got about a quarter of the way through this one before giving up. I liked his earlier stuff but this was nothing new. The fact that I've got about 20 other books waiting to be read was probably also a contributing factor.

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  2. I agree with you in terms of–the books aren't high quality lit, IMO, but that doesn't mean that they aren't GOOD books–in fact, most of the books I love reading are not “high quality lit”. They are fun and page-turners and contain lots of interesting info.

    I liked the book myself but I agree with the Professor–it was a bit too similar and “more of the same”, to me. I still liked it but it just seemed a bit formulaic after reading the first two…

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  3. Wow, we had really different opinions on this one! I liked Da Vinci Code and I loved Angels & Demons but this one was not great for me. It did inspire Jason and I to visit DC in the near future, lots of interesting info, but I couldn't really get into the story. You're so right about a lot of the conversations being unrealistic.

    This was my review of it, in case you're interested (it's the first one):
    http://www.amazon.ca/product-reviews/0385504225/ref=cm_cr_dp_hist_2?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&filterBy=addTwoStar

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  4. PiT – Yeah, the first part of the book was a bit slow (especially compared to his others), so I could see having a hard time getting into it.

    Adrienne – I figure, as long as we read, who cares what we read, right? I know someone who thinks “real” reading means only classics or biographies or history books. BORING! LOL!

    Andrea – it was a bit harder for me to get into than the others. I think that's why it took me a month to read the first 20%, then 3 days to read the rest. I'll go check out your review! Thanks for sharing!

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  5. Andrea (again) – I read your review, and it reminded me of something that I wanted to say in my post. The last few chapters were totally useless. The story ended, then it seemed like Dan Brown wanted to get the rest of his research in the book, so he wrote all these loooonnnggg explanations. I basically skimmed the last 50 pages or so! LOL!

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  6. Hi Alyssa,

    I haven't read the Lost Symbol and am not really tempted to. I thought the Da Vinci Code was thrilling and disturbing but basically rubbish. I thought Angel & Demons was thrilling and hilarious because basically rubbish! Thanks for your review.

    Kaye, booklover and bloglurker

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