Books I Haven’t Read

I’ve never really gotten in to reading classic literature. Once in a while I’ll give it a go, but usually end up getting annoyed with the language or pace. I buy them from time to time because I feel like I SHOULD read them, but they often end up back on the shelf.

I’ve done this with Great Expectations, The Great Gatsby, A Tale of Two Cities, among others.

I was at the dollar store today, and they had a bunch of classics for $1.25. So, I did it again, and picked up a copy of Little Women.

I can hear all the gasps of horror through the computer – “how can you call yourself a reader and have never read LITTLE WOMEN???”

Funny enough, when I got home, I checked our shelves, and sure enough there is a copy of this book already there. Clearly, I’ve tried this before.

The one I bought is really short though, so maybe it’s a kids version or something? Maybe that will help 😉

What books haven’t you read that people would be surprised about?

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Comments on: "Books I Haven’t Read" (5)

  1. I read Little Women, the original version, in 3rd grade. I don’t think you really need a kid’s version… it already is a kid’s version.

    The Great Gatsby sucks (read it in high school English). Haven’t read Great Expectations (I like a Christmas Carol and the Pickwick Papers and that’s pretty much it for Dickens). Tale of Two Cities was difficult for me and took several attempts (not because it of the hard, but because of the boring… I had similar trouble with Treasure Island, which is another book my mom loved, but I found hard-going). Really, any book without female characters or with terrible two dimensional female characters just isn’t going to do it for me (unless, as with the case of the Pickwick Papers, ALL the characters are played 2-D for laughs).

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    • Hmm…the first Little Women I have is a few hundred pages with small font, and the one I bought the other day is ~150 pages with big font. Haven’t bothered to compare yet!

      Definitely tough to read anything with badly developed female characters.

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      • It’s long, but it’s episodic. The girls (mostly) grow up during the course of the book, so it isn’t unlike a series of connected short stories (similar to a lot of early children’s books– like Beverly Cleary’s Henry Huggins stuff or Anne of Green Gables). It isn’t a difficult reading level.

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  2. Little Women was one of those I devoured in pre-teen & teen years. Loved it, and “Daddy Long Legs” that I read at the same time (same binding of books). That was by far the years when I read the most and some of the ones I tried at that age didn’t really work but I have taken up some of them in older years (some of the Russian ones – Tolstoy…).

    For me, I’m most surprised that I never picked up Moby Dick and actually finished it. Not sure why but I remember reading the first chapter in school but not more. Also, only ever read one Austen, didn’t really like them….. tried again in fall when we read one for book club but I was SO bored&annoyed with it ^^ Gatsby – I blame not being American so i failed to see the glory of that book 😉 Similar feeling when reading Steinbeck (only did two of them and didn’t like “Of Mice and Men”, never admitted it in school or book club though… they stare at me like I’ve missed something super important.)

    Oliver Twist is more enjoyable than Tale of Two cites (reading one classic instead of the other I mean). I’m personally a Graham Greene fan and recommend “The end of the Affair” and “the Third man”. He writes short sentences (which I am envious of) and keeps the stories quite interesting.

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    • I’ve tried a couple Austen books and haven’t made it through much. I read Cannery Row by Steinbeck and wasn’t a fan (but at least I read the whole thing! LOL!). Can’t say I’d want to read another of his.

      I might just conclude that I like contemporary fiction, and that’s okay…but part of me feels I shouldn’t give up.

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